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National Bible Week

The week of Thanksgiving is National Bible Week in the United States.

Suggested Group Activities for National Bible Week

In a country where Bibles are hard for some Christians to get, a broadcaster reads parts of the Bible on a radio program. He reads very slowly so listeners can copy the verses by hand. The listeners use the written verses as their “Bible.”

Have someone read Matthew 19:29 out loud very slowly while others in the group write the verse on paper or type it on a computer.

Crossing the Border Game
Guards in some countries also try to keep people from sneaking into their country, especially if they are carrying Bibles. The governments of some countries do not want their citizens to learn about Jesus. Christians in one place found a way to take Bibles into those countries in the winter. Guards near the border looked for footprints in the snow. They sent attack dogs in the direction of the footprints. So the Christians walked backwards in the snow at night to take Bibles into the countries that did not allow Bibles. When border guards looked down at the footprints from their towers in the morning, they sent their search dogs in the wrong direction!

How to Play
Divide into two teams with an equal number of players. Give each team a bag of three or four books. Make a starting line and a finish line several yards apart. Line up the teams behind the starting line. When a leader says, “Go,” the first player on each team walks/runs backwards to the finish line, carrying the bag of books. The player drops the books behind him beyond the finish line. The second player walks/runs backwards to the books, picks them up without turning around, then runs back to the starting line. Play continues until all the players on one team have finished the task. That team wins.

To Discuss
Smuggling Bibles into a country where Christians are persecuted can be risky. Smugglers can be arrested or attacked. They are willing to sacrifice their safety and take the risk. Did anyone have to sacrifice so that you would be able to read the Bible in your language?


Readers Talk to Us

Question: Some people wonder if young children should learn about persecuted Christians. How would you answer them?

Laura S., a third-grade teacher at a Christian school in Tennessee, replies:

“Jesus was persecuted, as were the apostles. This is our heritage as believers. We cannot ignore it. It is a great calling, and each child born into the household of faith has this calling.

“Should we shield our children from that reality? No. Persecuted Christians are their brothers and sisters in the kingdom of God. I want us to train our children to pray for those in need, and to care for the widows and orphans, especially those in the household of faith.”

What Do You Think?


Flames of Love

Richard Wurmbrand
Richard Wurmbrand

Pastor Richard Wurmbrand, the founder of The Voice of the Martyrs, was imprisoned for a total of 14 years in communist Romania for spreading the gospel. He talked about winning persecutors to Christ.

Pastor Wurmbrand once said,

“Once when a house was on fire, a man threw a cup of water on it, only to see it burn to the ground. The man then said, ‘Water does not extinguish fire.’”

Pastor Wurmbrand continued, “That’s ridiculous! A cup of water does not quench it, but fire engines with water hoses do.

“The little love we have shown until now has not succeeded in bringing tormentors to Christ. Flames of love might very well succeed.

“The fact is, I was once a crucifier, till an encounter with God’s all-forgiving love changed me. If I can be transformed, others can too.

“I will dedicate my life to this.”

To Think About: How might someone show only “a little love” to unbelievers? Whose love changed Pastor Wurmbrand? What did Pastor Wurmbrand mean when he said, “Flames of love might very well succeed”?


100 Ways Kids Can Help Persecuted Christians: #91–100

  1. Write a book report on a book about persecuted Christians.
  2. Plan to pray for Christians in Muslim countries during Muslim holidays.
  3. Hold a weekly or monthly fast from TV, computer games, or dessert as a prayer reminder.
  4. Write a letter to the editor of a publication, telling about current persecution.
  5. Study Bible passages about persecution and share them with someone.
  6. Send profits from a lemonade stand or garage sale to support VOM projects.
  7. Offer to show a DVD about persecution to a group or class.
  8. Hold an “underground church service.” Sing and pray quietly.
  9. Invite party guests to bring items needed by the persecuted instead of gifts.
  10. Send a description of your projects to VOM to share with others.


100 Ways Kids Can Help Persecuted Christians: #81–90

  1. Make a “Family Prayer Album” using clips from VOM publications.
  2. Display items about persecution at a history or geography fair.
  3. Leave a VOM publication in a car mechanic’s waiting room.
  4. Find the name of leaders of restricted nations in an almanac. Pray for them.
  5. Serve a dinner featuring food from a restricted country. Share about Christians there. (Find recipes from restricted countries in our Activity section or in the downloadable activity books on this site.)
  6. Make a parade float about courageous Christians.
  7. Phone a friend once a week to pray together for persecuted Christians.
  8. Design Christmas ornaments using photos from VOM publications.
  9. Hold an overnight lock-in, and spend the time learning about and praying for persecuted Christians.
  10. Collect spare change in a jar for a year to support a VOM project.