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Ten Facts About Life for Christians in Sudan

Sudanese girls

Parents and Teachers: The July 2017 issue of The Voice of the Martyrs magazine includes stories about courageous Christians in Sudan. To subscribe to the free monthly magazine, visit our subscription signup page. As you read the magazines, you may want to share stories from this site with your children. Then pray together for the people in the stories.

1.    Since 2012, the government of Sudan has dropped 4,000 bombs on Christians and others in the Nuba Mountain region of Sudan. Do the math: Is that more or less than one bomb a day? Watch a video of children in Sudan hiding from danger.

2.    Four of the most dangerous places to be in the Nuba Mountains are church buildings, schools, hospitals, and fields of crops. Bombers target the shiny roofs of buildings and crops that produce food.

3.    Christians continue to worship and encourage each other. Watch a video that tells what some Sudanese Christians did after their church was bombed.

4.    Only two doctors and three medical facilities are left to help more than one million people in the Nuba Mountain region. One of the medical facilities is a tent.

5.    The Voice of the Martyrs brings medical aid and medicines to the people.

6.    Thirteen VOM staff members have traveled to the war zones. One of them, Petr Jasek, was jailed for 445 days because of his Christian work in Sudan. Read more about Petr.

7.    VOM also brings Action Packs and other aid to the area. Watch videos about Action Packs here and here.

8.    Some Sudanese Christians feel forgotten. VOM’s visits are as important as the gifts they bring. “We don’t look at what you’re carrying,” said a Sudanese pastor, “but how often you come.”

9.    Sudanese Christians have a request. “Please tell the American church to pray for us,” said a patient at a VOM-supported clinic. “And also don’t forget us.”

10.    Sudanese Christians share aid they receive with their neighbors, even Muslim neighbors. Some Muslims are opening their minds and hearts to Jesus. “The Muslims in the region are so open to the gospel right now,” said VOM’s Africa Regional Director, Sean Paton. “All the support they receive is coming from Christians.”


Preschoolers in Jail

Mona and her children in jail

When Christian families in some countries wake up in the morning, they never know what struggles the day might bring. Three children in Sudan, ages 2, 4, and 6, are learning at an early age that, “In this world you will have trouble” (John 16:33).

One day, while their father was away, the police came and arrested their mother, Mona Matta. The police took the children to jail with her! No charges were filed against the family, and they were released after several hours.

But their troubles were not over. When the family got home, they discovered that a gang had destroyed all their belongings.

Pray that the family’s daily needs will be met. Pray that they will grow stronger in their faith in Jesus, who said, “Take heart! I have overcome the world” (John 16:33).

(Photo: Morning Star News)


Sudan: Hiding in Foxholes

The government of Sudan often drops bombs on the Nuba Mountain region of their country. “When we were there, 40 artillery shells landed close enough for us to hear them,” said a VOM worker who visited Christians in the area.

Sometimes the bombs hit churches. In one church that was destroyed, the explosion damaged the pulpit. The congregation fled to the mountains. They took the pulpit with them to remind them that Christ’s church can never be destroyed. Learn more about the “shrapnel pulpit” here.

Hospitals and schools are also attacked. In this video, a hospital worker describes patients scrambling for their safety into foxholes surrounding the hospital. You can see children running for foxholes and hear the sound of a bomber overhead.

Bombing continues in the Nuba Mountains. VOM helps and encourages the Christians who live there. Please ask God to protect those hiding from the bombs.


Make a Tukel

Sudan

Previous posts told about Christians in Sudan.

“Tukels” [TOO-kuhlz], like the one in the photo, are huts with cone-shaped roofs. Many Sudanese families live in tukels.

The roofs are made of neatly layered stalks of grass or grain. Sometimes, the roofs reach almost to the ground.

Sudan

To make a tukel roof, trace around a saucer or small plate on thick paper or cardstock. Cut out the circle. Then cut one slit from the edge of the circle to the center. Slide one edge of the slit under the other and tape or staple the edges together to form a cone. Draw or glue grass or thin sticks on the roof.

To make walls, staple together the ends of a cardboard strip to form a circular shape smaller than the large end of the roof. Cut out a door. Put the roof on top of the walls.


Christians Under Attack Carry a Pulpit Up a Mountain

The government of Sudan often drops bombs on the Nuba Mountain region of their country. “When we were there, 40 artillery shells landed close enough for us to hear them,” said a VOM worker who visited the area recently to encourage the Christians.

Sometimes the bombs hit churches. In one church that was destroyed, the explosion damaged the pulpit. The congregation fled to the mountains. They took the pulpit with them to remind them that Christ’s church can never be destroyed.

The video below tells more about the VOM workers’ trip to Sudan and about the Christians there. One of the Sudanese Christians in the video carries a gun “because there is always a threat of attack,” the VOM worker said.

As you watch the video, look for answers to the following questions.

  1. What kind of animal is the child milking at the first of the video?
  2. How long did it take the people to hike up the mountains?
  3. The Sudanese houses seen in the video are called “tukels.” What shape are their roofs?
  4. Where do the Christians stay at night for safety?