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Sudan: No Food for Christian Kids

South Sudanese children and their families have been driven from their homes by fighting in the region. As refugees, many live in camps in Sudan and Uganda.

In some camps, Muslims tell the Christian children that they must recite Muslim prayers in order to get food. (Read about differences between Islam and biblical Christianity here.)  A worker at the camp said, “They are given the choice to starve, or they are conditioned to say Islamic prayers before [being] given food.”

(Source: VOM Canada and other sources)

Please pray for Christian children in the refugee camps. Ask God to meet their daily needs and to keep them strong in their faith.


445 Days in Prison

Petr (left) with another prisoner

One night, Petr Jasek had a troubling dream. In the dream, he was locked in a prison. He saw the prison door shut, and he heard the lock click into place.

Petr was still thinking about the dream the next morning at church. A friend even noticed that he looked upset and asked him what was wrong.

The Dream Comes True
Shortly before Christmas about two years later, Petr was at an airport preparing to leave Sudan. As part of his job with The Voice of the Martyrs, he had been meeting with Sudanese Christians to discover how VOM could help them.

Suddenly an airport security officer tapped him on the shoulder. Authorities took away his camera and laptop, and questioned him for almost 24 hours. They knew about his Christian work in Sudan. But they falsely accused him of spying and other crimes, then they put him in prison at 1:30 in the morning.

At the Sudanese prison, Petr was amazed to see the same prison door and to hear the same lock clicking that he had seen and heard in his dream! The memory assured him that God had known what would happen to Petr in advance, and that He was in control.

Unfriendly Cellmates
Petr’s cellmates were sleeping on the floor when he arrived. They squeezed closer together to give Petr a small space to sleep. The next morning, they asked him for news from the outside world. He told them about an attack on innocent people in Paris by radical ISIS Muslims. When they heard the news, the prisoners jumped up and shouted for joy. Petr realized that his new roommates were also radical Muslims.

Day by day, the Muslims grew harsher toward Petr. They called him “filthy pig” or “filthy rat,” and they hit him when he didn’t answer to the insulting names. Petr prayed to be released.

A New Purpose
One night, 14 new prisoners from Eritrea were stuffed into Petr’s cell. Petr shared his testimony with them and told them the good news of Jesus. Two of them decided to follow Christ!

“From that day forward, I dedicated my prison time to the Lord,” Petr said. “I prayed, ‘If You will allow me opportunities to share the gospel, I will stay here as long as You want!’ I even stopped praying that I would be released from prison.”

Note: Petr was released after 14 months in prison, and he returned home to his family in the Czech Republic.

To Talk About
*If you were in prison for your Christian activities, what would you want Christians on the outside to pray for you?
*Why did Petr stop praying to be released from prison?
*Think of a task or chore that you don’t like to do. How could God use you in that situation to help you know Him better or to be a blessing to others?
*Petr met 14 new people in prison. They stayed in his cell for less than a day. Ask two or three people to act as newcomers and to role play the situation with you. What would you tell people about Jesus if you had only a short time with them?


Sudan: Building Blocks Scene

For many years, The Voice of the Martyrs has helped Christians under attack in Sudan. VOM supporters prepare Action Packs for Sudanese Christians, and VOM delivers medical supplies, medicine, and Bibles to them.

A reader found a unique way to illustrate VOM’s work in Sudan. They used interconnecting plastic building blocks to show VOM workers delivering goods to Christians in need. (See the photo below.)

Can you think of a unique way to share information about persecuted Christians with others?


Make a Thumb Piano

African thumb piano

Thumb pianos are instruments used in Sudan and other African countries to accompany singing. You can make a simple thumb piano.

Needed: 3 large bobby pins; a piece of sanded wood about 6 inches wide, 3½ inches tall, and ½ inch thick; pliers, and a staple gun.

Squeeze the looped ends of 3 bobby pins with pliers. As your release your hold on the bobby pins, they will break.

With a staple gun and the help of an adult, staple the broken pieces to the wood. Fasten each piece with 2 staples. Staple the first pin near the top of the pin (the broken end). To create different sounds, fasten each remaining pin further and further away from the top of the board — but no further than halfway down the pin. Bend the bottom ends of the pins upward, away from the board.

To play the thumb piano, hold it in both hands, with one hand on each side of the thumb piano, and pluck the pins with your thumbs.


Make a Tukel

“Tukels” [TOO-kuhlz] are huts with cone-shaped roofs. Many Sudanese families live in tukels.
The roofs are made of neatly layered stalks of grass or grain. Sometimes, the roofs reach almost to the ground.

To make a tukel roof, trace around a saucer or small plate on thick paper or cardstock. Cut out the circle. Then cut one slit from the edge of the circle to the center. Slide one edge of the slit under the other and tape or staple the edges together to form a cone. Draw or glue grass or thin sticks on the roof.

To make walls, staple together the ends of a cardboard strip to form a circular shape smaller than the large end of the roof. Cut out a door. Put the roof on top of the walls.