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Praise the Lord Around the World

Use the chart below to learn how to say “Praise the Lord” in 10 other languages. Sing the song “Hallelu, Hallelu, Hallelu, Hallelujah” or another song with the words “praise (ye) the Lord” in it. Substitute one or more of the phrases for the English words.

Country
Language
How To Say It
Iran Farsi KHOH-dah-rah SHOH-kr
Pakistan Punjabi RAHB-dee tah-REEF HO-vay
China Chinese tzahn-may joo
Colombia Spanish GLOH-ree-uh ah dee-ohs
Russia, Kazakhstan Russian SLAH-vuh BOH-goo
Many Muslim Countries Arabic MAHG-duh lah rahp
Eritrea Tigrinya gway-tah yeh mess ghen
Malaysia, Brunei Malay Poo-jee TOO-hahn
Nepal Nepali jay muh-SEE
Bangladesh Bangla ee-shohr-air goor-ohb hohk

Ten Sports from Around the World

Read about the 10 sports below. Then enter the name of a country where they are played in the Search box to learn more about life for Christians in those countries. Find ways to pray for the countries in The Voice of the Martyrs’ Global Prayer Guide.

Buzkashi
Buzkashi is a favorite sport in Afghanistan. It is a difficult and dangerous sport played by two teams on horseback. As in football, the players try to get control of an object and take it to a scoring area. But the object is not a ball; it’s a dead, headless goat or calf. Players compete to win money and prizes, and some fans dream of seeing the sport played in the Olympics someday.

Langdi
Langdi is a traditional game from India. Would you like to try it? Here are the basic rules. Two teams play on a square field. Players from one team stand in the square. The other team sends one player at a time into the square. That player must hop on one foot. Whoever is touched by the hopping player is out of the game. If the hopper puts his raised foot down, he is out and the teams change positions. The game is over when all the players on one team are out.

Kabaddi
Kabaddi is another popular sport in India. The rules are similar to the rules of langdi. But in kabaddi, the “raider” who enters the opposing team’s territory must repeat the word “kabaddi” [kah-buh-dee] over and over as he tags players. His goal is to tag as many players as possible—all in one breath. If he takes a second breath, he is out of the game.

Dhandi-Biu
Children in Nepal play dhandi-biu [DAHN-dee byoo]. The equipment for the game includes a long, flat stick and a large seed or small stick. The seed (or small stick) is placed on the ground. A player hits the end of the seed with the long stick, flipping the seed into the air. When the seed flies up, the player then taps it lightly into the air two or more times with the long stick. On the last hit, the player hits the seed as far away as he can.

Cricket
Cricket is somewhat like baseball. (See the photo above.) It is played mostly in countries that are British territories or used to be British territories. The bat looks a little like a boat oar. The fielders do not wear gloves. Unlike in baseball, after the “bowler” (pitcher) throws the ball, it may hit the ground and bounce up to the “batsman” (batter) before it is hit.

Kho Kho
Kho kho was invented in India. It is a form of tag played on a field between two teams. One team is the chasers and the other is the defenders. They switch roles after seven minutes. The team that tags out the defenders the quickest wins.

Chinlone
Chinlone is the national sport of Burma. Players stand in a circle. They try to keep a rattan ball (see the photo) in the air for as long as possible. The players may kick the ball up or pass it to another player with their feet or knees, but not with their hands.

Jaegi
Jaegi [JAY-ghee] is a Korean game similar to hacky sack. You can find instructions for making a jaegi here.

Netball
Netball is played in many countries, including Malaysia and Tanzania. It is a popular sport for women and girls. As in basketball, two teams try to shoot the ball through a hoop. But players do not dribble the ball. They may take only one step while holding the ball, and they must pass it to another player within a few seconds. Defenders who are trying to stop a player from shooting must stay at least three feet away from the player with the ball. The goal has no backboard.

Tent Pegging
According to legends from long ago, soldiers in some parts of the world had an unusual way of attacking enemy camps. While racing through the camp on horseback, the soldiers speared the pegs holding up their enemy’s tents, causing the tents to collapse. Perhaps that is how the sport of tent pegging began.

In modern tent pegging, players on horseback compete to see who can best draw a wooden block out of the ground with a sword or lance and carry it across a field. The sport is played in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and other countries.


Pakistan: Punished for Following Jesus

Pakistan

In many public schools in Pakistan, most of the students are Muslim. Christians in these schools are often forced to eat at separate tables. At one school, a Muslim teacher forced a Christian girl to stand in the hot sun until she fainted. The girl was being punished for wearing a cross necklace to school.

Christian parents can send their children to private Christian schools if they want to. But Christians who are poor are not able to pay for private schools.

Sobia, a teenager in Pakistan, told the following story to friends from The Voice of the Martyrs.

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Pakistan: No Longer Enemies

Pakistan

Ask God to show you how to share His love with others who need a helping hand during a time of struggle.

Seeta and Kamilah were teenage girls from a village in Pakistan. They were students at the village high school and their favorite subject was art. Like many Pakistani girls, they used their artistic talent to draw designs on the backs of their hands with henna dye. Since this was forbidden at school, Seeta and Kamilah drew designs on only one hand and kept that hand hidden in their clothes!

The two friends enjoyed learning languages. They could speak a little English, as well as two Pakistani languages. They also loved to watch television, but they were able to do so only when visiting cousins in a city. Their homes in the village didn’t have television.

One day, an earthquake shook the ground for six minutes in and around their village. When it ended, much of the village was rubble. Seeta and Kamilah could no longer attend school, study art, or learn languages. They didn’t even live in houses anymore; they lived in tents. Life became more of a struggle.

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Pakistan: New Struggles for Mehak

Churches in Pakistan often post guards outside their worship service to protect the worshipers. But the guards can’t always stop attacks.

In 2013, guards were posted at All Saints Church in Peshawar, Pakistan, when radical Muslims attacked the church. The attackers’ bombs injured many at the church, including 4-year-old Mehak.

Mehak has been in the hospital many times for surgery to heal her injuries. Recently she began having seizures. The doctors found that she has small blood clots in her brain. Please pray for her complete healing.

(Photo: Mehak)