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Homework and Academic Fair Ideas

Bold Believers in Nigeria

Are you looking for a topic for a school report or academic fair project? The free Bold Believers activity books in the Downloads section of this site provide information about many unique subjects. Read the list below to find examples of some of the topics featured in the books.

(Find additional homework help ideas in our posts Homework Help and Write a Report: Be a Voice.)

Bold Believers in Nigeria
Nigerian languages
Shariah law
Bold Believers in Pakistan
9/11, the Taliban, al-Qaida
Blasphemy laws
Bonded laborers
Pakistani culture
Bold Believers Among the Khmu of Southeast Asia
Who are the Khmu?
Buddhist beliefs
Bold Believers in North Korea
Robert Thomas, missionary
Learning About Islam
Muslim beliefs and practices
Comparing Islam and Christianity
The Quran
Women in Islam
Bold Believers in Burma
Buddhism
Bold Believers in Colombia
Comparing Marxism and Christianity
Bold Believers in Turkey
Smyrna, a Turkish city
Bold Believers in Gaza and the West Bank
Jerusalem
Bold Believers in Eritrea
Eritrean Christians
Bold Believers in Egypt
Making papyrus
Comparing Christianity and the ancient religion of the Pharaohs
Bold Believers Among China’s Uygurs
Who are the Uygurs?
Bold Believers in China
Papermaking
Big things in China
Christians in China
Bold missionaries who went to China
Bold Believers in Iraq
Sunni and Shi’ite Muslims
Bold Believers in Algeria and Tunisia
Christians in North Africa (also see Bold Believers in Morocco and Egypt)
Berbers and Berber cave homes (also see Bold Believers in Morocco)
Bold Believers in Indonesia
Religions of Indonesia
Islands of Indonesia
Bold Believers in India
The states of India
Hinduism
Bold Believers of the Hmong People
The Hmong people
Bold Believers in Vietnam
The religions of Vietnam
Children of Christian prisoners
Bold Believers in Nepal
The religions of Nepal
Bold Believers in Chiapas (Mexico)
Christians in Chiapas
Bold Believers in Ethiopia
Ethiopian culture
Bold Believers in Uzbekistan
Uzbek culture

Hope in North Korea

Newsletter

Parents and Teachers: The September 2013 issue of The Voice of the Martyrs newsletter features information about bold North Korean Christians. To subscribe to the free monthly newsletter, visit our subscription signup page. As you read the newsletters, you may want to share stories from this site about the featured Christians with your children. Then pray together for the people in the stories.

“Mrs. Kim” grew up in North Korea. At school, the teachers taught her that Christians are mean monsters. “I really believed everything that was taught to us,” Mrs. Kim said, “so I thought the Bible was made up.”

Life in North Korea is difficult. Many people do not have enough to eat, and the government controls every part of the citizens’ lives.

After Mrs. Kim grew up and had children, life became even more difficult. One of her daughters was put in prison after officials caught her trying to escape the country. Her son disappeared after he deserted his job in the North Korean army. The government punished the entire family by sending them out of the city to live in the harsh countryside.

Mrs. Kim was very sad.

A New Life
Mrs. Kim didn’t know where her son was, and she feared he might be dead. But one day she had a vision of someone touching her son’s body. Two years later, her son returned! He told Mrs. Kim, “God saved me.” Mrs. Kim didn’t understand at the time, but later she came to believe that the person in her vision was Jesus.

Mrs. Kim escaped from North Korea and moved to South Korea, a much freer country. She began going to church, and accepted Christ as her savior two years later. “Now my life belonged to God,” she said.

A New Calling
Mrs. Kim is now 80 years old, and she has started a new ministry! She wants to reach North Koreans for Christ. “I want to give them hope,” she said.

Mrs. Kim talks to North Koreans about Jesus by cell phone. In five years, she led 28 people to Christ over the phone! The North Korean government does not allow people to make such phone calls, and any North Koreans caught doing so risk going to prison.

Mrs. Kim transmits her gospel messages through a contact in North Korea who owns one of the illegal phones. The calls cost about $10 an hour. Mrs. Kim shares Bible passages with her family during the calls, and her family writes them down. Sometimes they make up tunes to help them remember the words.

Mrs. Kim even led her cell phone contact person to Christ! “I want to be God’s salt and light,” Mrs. Kim said. She prays that she will stay healthy enough to continue her work. “Even if I die,” she said, “I’m going to die in the middle of doing God’s work.”

To Think About and Do

  • Ask a friend to read you a Bible verse over the phone while you write it down. What if the only Scriptures you owned were verses you wrote down? Do you think you would take good care of the verses and read them often?
  • Try to make up a tune that will help you remember the verse you wrote down.
  • Do you think you could share the gospel with someone over the phone like Mrs. Kim did? Try telling someone three reasons Jesus is special to you over the phone.

(To protect their identities, the names of some of the people on this website and some identifying details have been changed. Some of the quotes and stories have been edited and paraphrased from the original sources for clarity.)


Double Country Word Find

Print the puzzle below. Hidden in the puzzle are the names of seven countries where Christian activities are limited in some way. Each country’s name is hidden TWICE. Look for the following countries running vertically (up and down), horizontally (across), or diagonally (slanted): Iraq, China, Nigeria, North Korea, India, Vietnam, Algeria.

N O R T H K O R E A
V I E T N A M A Z Y
N I B C C I N D I A
I I E W H T G S H A
G C G T I I W I C L
E X D E N R N R H G
R E V F R A A A I E
I N D I A I M Q N R
A L G E R I A U A I
N O R T H K O R E A

No Longer Robots

North Korea

The following story tells about North Korean children at a “safe house” in China.

Background: In North Korea, the government tries to control every activity. Sometimes the people seem like robots. Children in North Korea wake up to speeches played over loudspeakers. The speeches praise North Korea’s leaders. Children march to school where they memorize more about their leaders in their school subjects. Before meals, the children salute a picture of the leader and thank him for their food.

If, as many do, they leave North Korea to look for food and freedom, children are told by their friends, “In China, look for a building with a small cross on it. You will find help there.” Christians in China secretly care for North Korean children and protect them from people who want to send them back to North Korea. They put a small cross on their houses so needy North Koreans can find them.

Mr. Choi is a Chinese Christian who helps care for the children when he visits these secret “safe houses.” He told the following story.

Mr. Choi’s Story
When I arrived, the children sang “Jesus Loves Me,” which they had recently learned from the Christians who take care of them. They said grace before our meal. At bedtime, they read a Bible story.

But something was not right. They were singing, praying, and reading like robots. They could not stop acting like they had been taught to act in North Korea.

At the safe house, some of the children were orphans, and others had come to China alone without their families. But they did not cry. I held their hands and sang to them. Then I began to pray for them aloud. I prayed from my heart, not like a robot.

“Is it really okay to pray like that?” one boy asked.

“Yes, of course,” I answered. “God is my Father! I can tell Him anything.”

Slowly they began to understand. Then they started to cry. “What would you like to tell God?” I asked.

“God, it hurts,” prayed one girl who missed her family. “I want to see my family again,” another prayed.

The children in the safe house continued learning how to pray to God as their Father. Now they understand that He can comfort them when they are sad. They know that they do not have to act like robots for their heavenly Father to love them. Please pray for them and for those still in North Korea who do not yet know the truth.

Discussion Suggestions for Classes

  • Who told the North Korean children about Jesus?
  • What might it look like if you sang a song like a robot? (Teachers and Parents: Encourage the children to sing a simple secular song, rather than a Christian song, so they will not appear to be mocking Christian principles in any way.)
  • Do you pray before you eat? Are your mealtime and bedtime prayers from your heart, or do you ever pray like a robot?

(Source: Kids of Courage VBS curriculum)


Reaching North Koreans

Iran
Christians put food on the beds of North Koreans

In North Korea, it is against the law to share the gospel of Jesus. But Christians from other countries are finding ways to reach North Koreans with the truth. Balloons that carry Scriptures are floated into North Korea from outside the country.

Some North Koreans get jobs in other Asian countries. They return to their home country to see their families. But while they are away, VOM workers try to help them learn about salvation through Jesus Christ.

One Christian team traveled more than 3,000 miles in nine days to find North Korean workers to visit. The group faced a variety of difficulties on their trip.

A Hard Trip
On one of their stops, they quickly placed packages under the pillows and blankets in dormitories for 300 North Korean workers. The packages were filled with medicine, Christian pamphlets, and MP3 players containing Christian audio books.

After about 10 minutes, several people ran toward the team, yelling at them and threatening them. The workers quickly got in their cars and drove away.

The next day, the Christians tried to deliver packages to workers at another location. The North Korean workers were eager to receive the packages, but they ran away when a North Korean officer came into view. A few of the workers still managed to take a package.

At the Christians’ next stop, the North Korean workers were very poor and had little food. They were so surprised by the team’s visit that they almost cried.

But when a North Korean policeman appeared, the workers stepped away sadly and said, “We do not need anything.” Some of the workers had managed to hide MP3 players in their pants without the policeman seeing them. Perhaps they will listen to the books on the players and give their lives to Jesus.

Due to the poor conditions of the roads, a shock absorber was torn off one of the team’s cars, and the wheels will have to be replaced. But they hope to go on more trips in Asia to bring hope into the lives of North Koreans. They are asking the Holy Spirit to move in the hearts of North Korean workers.

To Talk About
What are some of the difficulties the Christians faced when they visited North Koreans? Do you think you could share the gospel with someone you know? What are some of the obstacles you might face?