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World Missions Camporee

Learning about North Korea

Earlier this year, a troop of American Heritage Girls from Frisco, Texas, participated in a camporee with other girls from northeast Texas. American Heritage Girls is a Christian scouting-type group, and the focus of the camporee was world missions.

The Frisco troop set up a North Korea booth, and members spoke about North Korea to more than 50 girls ages 9 to 12. The girls used information from The Voice of the Martyrs newsletters and Kids of Courage resources to prepare their presentations.

“I learned that Christians in North Korea need to have much strength and courage to spread the Word,” said Wren, age 15, who was one of the presenters. “Some of the girls we were teaching had no idea about the things we were teaching them, so it felt good to get them informed.”

“What a huge blessing it was to speak about North Korea to girls who had absolutely no idea what life [in North Korea] is like for Christians and non-Christians alike,” said Emily, an adult leader. “Many of their eyes were opened to the importance of praying for persecuted Christians and those who have not yet heard the gospel.”

Have you shared information about persecuted Christians with others in a unique setting? If so, use the “Contact Us” button at the bottom of this page to let VOM know about it.


Grandma Park

The Voice of the Martyrs USA is part of a worldwide family of missions that were started through the influence of Pastor Richard Wurmbrand. SDOK is VOM’s sister mission in the Netherlands. Stef is SDOK’s children’s publication and website.

The following story comes from Stef magazine. The grandchild of a woman who escaped from North Korea tells the story.

My Grandmother
I want to tell you something about my grandmother, “Grandma Park.” She used to live in North Korea, and she is a Christian. Her husband, who was my grandfather, died and left her with four children.

A great famine broke out, and many people were hungry. My grandmother fled with her children to South Korea to find food. To escape, they had to swim across an ice-cold river.

[If North Korean soldiers had seen them, the soldiers would have shot them or sent them to a prison camp. The family did not know who they could trust on their journey. They didn’t know when they would eat or where they would sleep.]

Instead of worrying, Grandma Park sang praises to God and prayer, then she got strength and courage.

North Korean hymnal

Promise
My grandmother told me that she promised to serve God if they arrived safely in South Korea. She does that now. She is also studying at a Bible school. She always says, “Serving God is my greatest joy, and I cannot wait until I meet Him in heaven.”

I think I’ve got a special grandmother.

Stef says:
Do you know that you can do what Grandma Park did? If you are worried about something, you can praise God and say, “Father, You are a mighty God. Thank You that You love me so much. And I love you.”

Grandma Park knew that God was with her. He always sent the right people to help her on her long journey.

Are you worried? Then praise God. He will help you find peace in your heart.

(Source: SDOK. Translated and edited. To protect their identities, the names of some of the people on this website and some identifying details have been changed.)


Foster Child’s Faith Becomes Real, Part 2

The previous post told the story of Mary, a homeless child who found help from a kind Christian family. Read the post, then read more about Mary below.

When you read Mary’s story in the previous post, did you wonder where she lived? It may surprise you to learn that Mary came from North Korea.

She secretly escaped from North Korea because there was never enough food to eat. Many children did not go to school because they were too hungry to learn. She sneaked past North Korean guards to enter China, where her foster family lived. Christians in China can be arrested for helping North Koreans, so her foster family had to be careful.

After Mary left her foster family, she began to draw closer to God. She wanted to encourage secret Christians still living in North Korea. Mary got a job with The Voice of the Martyrs-Korea in South Korea. She helped broadcast Christian radio messages into North Korea. Mary said, “I am blessed by God with the life I now have, and I want to serve Him forever with a thankful heart.”

(Source: VOM-Australia. Edited for length and clarity.)

Read another story and watch a video about Christianity in North Korea here.
Read what can happen to people in North Korea who listen to Christian radio broadcasts here.


Braid a Bible Rope

In the 1800s, three Koreans went to China to find work. While they were in China, a Christian shared the gospel with them. They decided to follow Jesus! The men wondered how they could take the good news to the people in their home country, where it was against the law to preach the gospel.

They planned to try to smuggle a Bible into Korea. The first man hid a Bible in his pack of belongings and started out on the long journey home. When he got to Korea, officials found his Bible and executed him. The same thing happened to the second man when he tried to cross the border into Korea with a hidden Bible.

The third Christian knew he had to try something different. He carefully tore out the pages of his Bible. Then he folded each page into a narrow strip. Next he wove the strips into a long rope and tied his pack with the rope. He easily got past the guards at the border with his Bible rope. After he untied the rope and put the Bible back together, he shared the gospel wherever he went.

(Source: On This Day by Robert J. Morgan (Nashville:Thomas Nelson, 1997)

To Try
Cut an 8½- by 11-inch piece of paper in half lengthwise. Write Genesis 1:1 in Korean (see above), or print a copy to tape on one of the halves. Fold or roll the page lengthwise into a tight narrow strip, and tape it shut. Ask someone who is good at braiding to help you braid the page into a homemade “rope,” using yarn or thick string for the other two strands of the rope.

Hide the Bible verse rope in a suitcase full of clothes and other items. Ask someone who does not know about your Bible rope to see if they can find a Bible verse in the suitcase.

(Sources: Bold Believers in North Korea and The Torchlighters Ultimate Activity Book)


Ching’s Dad

The Voice of the Martyrs USA is part of a worldwide family of missions that were started through the influence of Pastor Richard Wurmbrand. SDOK is VOM’s sister mission in the Netherlands. Stef is SDOK’s children’s publication and website.

The following story comes from Stef magazine.

Close to the Border
Hi, I’m Ching. I have a brother, a father, and a mother. My father is half Chinese and half Korean. He studied to become a pastor. When he was finished with his studies, he was asked to be a pastor at a church in China near the North Korean border.

My father prayed about it, and then he knew, “Yes, that is my place.”

Hungry
My father was only there for a short time when a famine broke out in North Korea. It was really terrible. The people were very hungry. Many tried to cross the border into China. They were desperately looking for food, medicine, and clothing.

Building with a Cross
Our church has a big cross on it. North Koreans had learned that they could find help at a special building with a cross. When they came to our church, they saw love in the eyes of my father.

Many people came to faith in Christ at the church. My father trained them to go back to North Korea to tell their people about Jesus. They knew it would be dangerous work. But my father said, “It’s better to die with God than to live in a free land without Him.”

Warning
Chinese and South Korean officers warned my father, “Your life is in danger [from enemies in North Korea who don’t like Christians].” I heard my parents talk about it. They thought about quitting their work with North Koreans. But God let them know they had to continue. They sent my brother and me to a safer school.

The Word Continues
One day my father got a phone call. My mother didn’t know who was on the line, but it seemed to be someone my father knew. She heard him say, “I’m coming!”

By dinnertime, my father had not come home. Church members went on a search for him. They found his car on the border. He was in it. North Koreans had paid someone to attack him, and he died.

We are sad that my dear father is no longer here. In the beginning, my mother was really angry. I believe that she is not angry anymore. She prays a lot that the North Korean leader will come to know God.

We live in the same place, and we go to the same church. But things have changed. My mother does not dare to help the North Koreans anymore.

But do you know what I like? A lot of people who my father helped now believe in God, and they do the same work he did. So the work for God continues.

Pray
Please join Ching’s mother in praying that North Korea’s leader will come to know God, and pray for Ching’s family.

(Source: SDOK. Translated and edited. To protect their identities, the names of some of the people on this website and some identifying details have been changed.)