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Indonesian Toy Car

Toy Car

Jeruk bali is a fruit from Indonesia with a thick skin. (The fruit is also known as a pomelo.) In times past, Indonesian children made cars out of the skin of the fruit. They cut wheels and car shapes out of the skin and attached the wheels with small strong sticks about the thickness of toothpicks. A long stick attached to the back or a string tied to the front allowed the child to push or pull the car.

Try making a toy car like the ones in the photo out of the skin of an orange or honeydew melon and toothpicks. (A lime was used for the “driver.”)

Pray that all Indonesian children will learn that Jesus loves them.


Indonesia: Social Distancing Raid

A Christian family in Indonesia were worshiping God at home. They were following their government’s instructions to stay home for social distancing during the coronavirus pandemic.

A Muslim neighbor heard them as they worshiped. He burst into family’s home and told them they could not hold a Christian meeting at their house. As a neighborhood leader watched from the doorway, one family member began recording the neighbor’s outburst on a cell phone.

The man shook a stick at the family and warned them that he would return with a mob if they didn’t stop worshiping. The family later filed a police report. “We don’t understand why these men were causing problems with us, since we were following our government’s advice to stay home,” they said.

Pray for believers around the globe who are encountering persecution during this unique time. Pray that persecutors will have new opportunities to hear and follow God’s will.

(Source: icommittopray.com)


Indonesian Recipes

Crops of Indonesia Treat

Three main crops of Indonesia are rice, cocoa, and peanuts. You can make an American recipe using all of them.

What You Will Need:

  • 6 cups of crispy rice cereal
  • 1/2 cup of honey
  • 1 cup of peanut butter
  • 3/4 cup of chocolate chips
  1. Combine cereal, honey, peanut butter, and chocolate chips.
  2. Spread the mixture in a large pan and freeze it.
  3. Cut into squares to eat.

Pisang Goreng (Fried Bananas), An Indonesian Treat

What You Will Need:

  • 3/4 cup flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup coconut milk
  • 1/2 cup of water
  • 1 egg (beaten)
  • 6 to 7 bananas
  • Cooking oil
  1. Mix flour, baking powder, and salt.
  2. Add coconut milk, water, and egg.
  3. Beat until smooth.
  4. Let the batter sit for 15 minutes.
  5. Cut 6 medium or 7 small bananas in half.
  6. Dip half a banana at a time in the batter to cover it.
  7. With the help of an adult, remove each banana with a fork, and deep fry it in hot oil until brown.
  8. Drain on paper towels and serve.

Indonesian Game: Semut, Orang, Gajah

Have you ever played the game “Rock, Paper, Scissors”? If not, ask someone familiar with the game to teach you. Then try this Indonesian variation.

Two players face each other and hold out a fist in front of them. On the count of three, each makes one of the following hand signs:

  • Semut (pronounced suh-MOOT): point with the little finger.
  • Orang (orr-AHNG): point with the first finger.
  • Gajah (gha-jah): point with the thumb.
  • Semut means ant.
  • Orang means person.
  • Gajah means elephant.

If one player gives the sign for semut and the other for orang, orang wins because a person can step on an ant. Semut beats gajah because an ant can crawl in an elephant’s ear and bite or tickle it. Gajah wins against orang because an elephant can stomp on a person.

Note: The word “orangutan” comes from the Indonesian words “orang,” meaning “person,” and “hutan,” meaning “forest.” Orangutans are native to Indonesia.


Indonesia: Toddler Encourages Dad

[Photo: Indonesian mother and child]

Mehfri and his wife are Christians in Indonesia. Two years ago, they had a baby daughter.

Most people in Indonesia are Muslims. Mehfri prays that his daughter will be a devoted follower of Jesus. He already encourages her to be strong in her faith by telling her, “You must stay on fire.”

Attacked
Mehfri made friends with a teacher at an elementary school for Muslim children. After meeting with Mehfri for three months to discuss Jesus, the teacher became a Christian.

Then one day, Mehfri went to the man’s home to see him. But the teacher’s Muslim son met him outside the house. The son and three men with sticks beat up Mehfri, who then sped away on his motorbike.

Encouragement
At home, Mehfri’s daughter saw that her father was in pain from his injuries. What do you think she said to him? “You must stay on fire, for me,” she told him. “You must stay on fire.” Even though he was suffering, Mehfri smiled.

Mehfri and his wife prayed for the attackers. Their family has moved to another city in Indonesia, where they are still reaching Muslims for Christ. “We must follow Jesus,” Mehfri said. “We don’t know about the future, but we must face it.” He, his wife, and his daughter will continue to encourage one another to “stay on fire.”

(Source: The February 2020 The Voice of the Martyrs magazine.)

To learn more about Christians in Indonesia, download Bold Believers in Indonesia from the free Downloads section.