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Robert Morrison and Macau

Macau
Macau today

Robert Morrison was the youngest of eight children. As a youth, he read missionary magazines and dreamed of being a missionary someday. But his mother wanted him to stay near his family in England. So he promised he would not become a missionary as long as she was alive. Sadly, she died a few short years after he made the promise. At the age of 20, Morrison began preparing to be a missionary.

He prayed that God would send him to a place where difficulties were the greatest.

God answered his prayer. Morrison arrived in China in 1807. For the next 25 years, he faced obstacles and problems while he worked to bring the good news of Jesus to people in China.

He lived part of that time in Macau, a colony in China ruled by Portugal. In Macau, he baptized a new Chinese Christian, and translated the Bible into Chinese. After his time serving the Lord on earth, he was buried in Macau.

Macau Today
Today Macau is ruled by China. Chinese and Portuguese are the official languages. In the past, most of the people were Christians. However, over time, it became “the first Christian territory in Asia to become non-Christian.” (Operation World)

Much of the money in Macau comes from people who travel to Macau to gamble. Macau has been called “the City of Sin.” During times when Macau brings in less money, some of the citizens are worried about losing their riches.

(Sources include: CIA Factbook, Operation World, and From Jesus to Irian Jaya)

To Talk About

  • What are some reasons parents might not want their children to become missionaries? What are some reasons other parents might want their children to become missionaries?
  • What do you think are some of reasons a Christian country might become a non-Christian country?

Prayer Points

  • “Gambling is a religion” in Macau (Operation World). Pray that people in Macau will seek Jesus instead of uncertain wealth.
  • Ask God to strengthen those who are spreading the gospel in Macau in spite of obstacles and problems.

Uygur Calligraphy

Scripture
Click the image to open the calligraphy PDF file.

Calligraphy is a respected art among the Uygurs. Print these Uygur phrases in calligraphy and see if you can copy them. Uygur is written from right to left instead of left to right like English.

Learn more in Bold Believers Among China’s Uygurs, available in the Downloads section.


Uygur Maze

Maze
Click the image to open the maze PDF file.

The Uygur child in this maze needs help finding the way home from the garden. Print the maze and see if you can help.


Uygur Tightrope Walking

Acrobatics is a traditional type of performance art among Uygurs. Some Uygurs have broken world records in tightrope walking. Once, a 3-year-old Uygur performer walked backwards across a tightrope that was stretched about 100 feet off the ground. And he was blindfolded!

Uygur Christians must feel like they are walking on an invisible tightrope sometimes. Below them, waiting for them to fall, are China’s communist leaders who want to control all the religions in the country. There are also Muslim neighbors and relatives who do not want them to be Christian. Just like tightrope walkers, Uygur Christians can get in trouble if they take one wrong step.

To Try: Stretch a rope or string along the ground. See if you can walk along the rope backwards. Try it blindfolded.


Uygurs: Tornissa and the Unlikely Letter

China

Uygurs [also spelled “Uyghurs;” pronounced “WEE-gurz”] are a people group living mainly in northwest China. Almost all Uygurs are Muslim. China’s communist leaders want to control all religions in their country. Officials are often suspicious of Muslims or Christians who take their faith seriously.

Much has been reported in the news about internment camps for Uygur Muslims in northeastern China. However, Christians, Buddhists, Kazakh people, and other perceived threats to the Communist government are also imprisoned in the camps.

Learn more in Bold Believers Among China’s Uygurs, available in the Downloads section.

Read below the story of a Uygur girl who learned about Jesus from missionaries in the 1930s.

In the late 1800s, Swedish missionaries and other Christians worked among the Uygur Muslim people in Xinjiang, China. Then during the 1930s, a great persecution of Uygur Christians began. Missionaries were kicked out of Xinjiang.

Tornissa, a Uygur girl, was raised by Swedish missionaries in a Christian orphanage. She was 14 years old when the missionaries were forced to leave Xinjiang.

After the missionaries left, Chinese officials put Tornissa in prison for two years. She was treated badly in prison. She thought she would die from the harsh treatment. But God healed her after she was released.

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