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New Ideas for Afghans

Afghanistan
Girls skateboarding in Afghanistan

“Girls don’t go out and play!” an Afghan girl a told a visitor from the United States. Traditionally girls and women in Afghanistan have not had the opportunity to learn new activities outside their homes. Some strict Muslims in Afghanistan do not approve of girls even going to school.

A group of people from other countries started skateboarding classes in Afghanistan. Girls are welcome. Students can take other classes besides skateboarding. “[It’s] not just about skateboarding. It’s about giving people life skills and hope for the future,” said a spokesman for the group.

More Hope
The Bible talks of an even “better hope” that brings us closer to God. (See Hebrews 7:20.) Christians are bringing that hope to those in Afghanistan, too.

Christians in Afghanistan are telling others about their hope in Christ. Christian websites and radio broadcasts from outside the country are teaching people that not all Afghans are Muslims; some Afghans follow Jesus. This is a new idea to some viewers and listeners.

The Voice of the Martyrs helps Christians who want to reach Muslims with the gospel. Learn more here.

To learn more about Christians in Afghanistan, enter “Afghanistan” in the search box, or Download Bold Believers in Afghanistan free from the Download section.

Photo credit: RhianonB / Wikipedia


A Good Advertisement

Afghanistan
A Muslim woman in Afghanistan

TV programs in Afghanistan are complaining about Christianity and Christians. The anti-Christian programs warn that many Muslims in Afghanistan are becoming Christians. On one program, a Muslim leader told the address of a Christian website.

Afghans are discovering new facts from the anti-Christian programs.

  • They are learning that not all Afghans are Muslims; some of them follow Jesus. Some viewers did not know that.
  • They are learning that there are Christian websites in their own language.

The programs are turning out to be a good advertisement for Christianity!


New TV Shows in Pakistan and Afghanistan

Afghanistan

New TV shows are causing disagreements in some Muslim countries.

Very strict Muslims in Afghanistan do not approve of music, movies, or TV. They are trying to stop a new reality talent show, Afghanistan’s Got Talent from airing on TV in Afghanistan. The show is scheduled to start this month.

“I am going to start a jihad* against those kinds of shows and programs on our television channels,” said one Afghan leader.

In Pakistan, a new cartoon show, Burka Avenger, features a superhero who wears a burka when she fights crime. (A burka is a tent-like robe that covers the body and face, or everything but the eyes.)

The Burka Avenger fights against evil using books and pens as weapons. In one episode, she fights villains who try to close schools.

In real life in Pakistan, strict Muslims in some areas have closed schools and try to keep girls from getting an education.

(Sources include Mohabat News)

Muslims in some countries do not agree with the rules of stricter Muslims. Some of them are looking the Christianity for answers. If they decide to follow Jesus, they will face persecution from Muslims who do not yet know him.

* Not all Muslims agree on the meaning of “jihad.” In this case, it is clear that the leader will work against the TV program based on his Muslim beliefs.


Bold Believers in Afghanistan

Bold Believers in Afghanistan

Very few countries have lower life expectancies than Afghanistan (women: 51 years; men: 48 years). Most Afghans have short, harsh lives and many never learn the truth about Jesus.

But bold Christian believers are working to change things! Afghans are hearing the good news of Jesus while living in other countries as refugees, or from Christian radio programs broadcast from outside of Afghanistan. After giving their lives to Christ, the new Christians look for ways to share the truth with other Afghans.

Read more about Afghanistan’s courageous Christians in Bold Believers in Afghanistan, available for free download in the Downloads section of this website.

The color photos, true stories, activities games, recipes, and country facts in the book can help you learn about past and current believers in a country that is often in the news.


Snack and Share

Baklava

Baklava is a treat enjoyed by children in many countries, including Iran. Try the recipe below. Can you share the treat with a Sunday school class or group and tell them about Christians in Iran? Read the post Iranian Date Snack to learn how to make another Iranian snack.

Persian Baklava
Syrup Ingredients:
3 cups sugar
1½ cups water
2 tbsp. lemon juice

Filling Ingredients
4 cups chopped almonds
¼ cup sugar
¼ tsp. cardamom

Additional Ingredients
1 box phyllo dough (24 sheets)
1 stick melted butter

Instructions

  1. Make the syrup first so it can cool. Over low heat, stir together the sugar, water, and lemon juice until the sugar dissolves. Increase the heat to medium, and cook without stirring about 5 more minutes until the mixture is a little syrupy.
  2. In a separate bowl, stir together the filling ingredients.
  3. Follow the instructions on the phyllo dough box about working with the dough. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 13-inch-by-9-inch baking pan. Put one sheet of phyllo in the pan and brush lightly with melted butter. Repeat with five to seven more phyllo sheets. Spread half the filling on top of the stack. Repeat the process with six to eight more sheets and the rest of the filling. Top with six to eight more buttered sheets.
  4. Use a sharp knife to cut six lengthwise strips through the top six to eight sheets of phyllo. The strips will be about 1¾ inches apart. Then cut 1½-inch diagonal strips across the lengthwise strips.
  5. Sprinkle the top sheet with cold water. Bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes. Reduce the heat to 300 degrees, and bake about 15 more minutes until golden brown.
  6. Cut through the lengthwise and diagonal lines all the way to the bottom of the baklava. Pour the cooled syrup over the hot baklava and let it cool for at least 4 hours before cutting into the squares and serving.

Image credit: Kultigin/Wikipedia