Donate | VOM Resources

BBiS

Bold Believers in North Korea

Bold Believers in North Korea includes stories, history and culture facts, activities, and recipes that help children understand the daily lives of people in a country where citizens are forbidden to practice Christianity. The 54-page book is available free from the Downloads section of this site.

Spotlight Story

Morocco: A Bully Finds a Better Way

Morocco

Aaron was a Muslim teenager from a large family in Morocco. Sometimes he was a bully to his sisters and cousins. He called them names and started arguments with them for little or no reason.

Many young people from Morocco leave their country and get jobs in another country. Two of Aaron’s older cousins, Esther and John, did just that. In his new home, John met some Christians who shared with him the truth about Jesus.

When Aaron heard that John had become a Christian, he was upset. The Muslim holy book, the Koran, says that Muslims who convert to other religions are “losers” (Koran Sura 3:85). Then Aaron found out that Esther had also decided to give her life to Jesus.

Aaron began e-mailing John to ask him questions. “Why did you and Esther become Christians?” he asked. “Is it because you are around other Christians and you wanted to follow their customs? Is it just a new habit you started?”

Read the rest of this entry »


Feature Story

North Korea: In Trouble for Telling the Truth

North Korea

Note: To protect their identities, the names of some of the people on this Web site and some identifying details have been changed. Some of the quotes are edited and paraphrased from the original sources for clarity.

Cheerleaders in Jail
News reports in early 2006 told a strange story. The reports said that several cheerleaders were sent to prison in North Korea. Some people say the cheerleaders were arrested for talking about things they saw on a trip to South Korea.

The North Korean government sent cheerleaders to athletic games in South Korea three times in recent years. The cheerleaders surprised and impressed everyone with their perfect-looking performances. But later, a prison inmate who escaped from North Korea said he had seen some of the cheerleaders in prison.

Reporters are not sure if the cheerleaders are really in prison for “talking too much.” But it would not be unusual for North Korea to punish people for speaking the truth.

Read the rest of this entry »


Spotlight Story

A Pencil Gets Courage

North Korea

Pencil was scared. His three friends, Eraser, Paper Clip, and Pen, had just been arrested. Pencil and his friends were Christians in North Korea. The North Korean government has harsh rules to control the activities of believers. The three Christians were arrested for sharing the gospel.

Pencil was a Christian too, but he was too shy and scared to share his faith. When he tried, his mouth became dry, his hands shook, and he couldn’t make the words come out of his mouth. He was even more fearful after his friends were arrested.

Pencil and his friends had learned about Jesus from a Chinese Christian worker. The Christian encouraged them to use nicknames to make it harder for the police to know who they really were. So the friends had chosen the names of school supplies for their nicknames.

Read the rest of this entry »


Spotlight Story

Leila: An Egyptian Kid of Courage

Egypt

Into the Den of Infidels is a book that tells the stories of Muslims in Egypt who continued to seek the truth even in the face of great obstacles. The following true story is taken from the book. It has been edited.

Leila was the oldest of four sisters in an Egyptian family. (The photo shows a girl in Egypt washing her clothes.) Her father was a strict Muslim who went to the mosque to pray five times every day. Her mother was a Muslim, too, but was not as strict in following Muslim practices.

Read the rest of this entry »


Spotlight Story

The Six-Year-Old Evangelist

Iran

The following story is adapted from a story in the book Iran: Desperate for God by The Voice of the Martyrs.

In Tehran, Iran, a 6-year-old boy watched a Christian television program about Jesus. The Muslim government does not allow Christian TV programs to be produced in Iran. But they cannot control what is broadcast into Iran from other countries by satellite.

As the boy listened to the followers of Jesus on his TV, he sang along with them and prayed when they prayed. One morning before school, he said to his mother, “I want to tell my teacher about Jesus. What can I do?”

Read the rest of this entry »