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Bold Believers in North Korea

Bold Believers in North Korea includes stories, history and culture facts, activities, and recipes that help children understand the daily lives of people in a country where citizens are forbidden to practice Christianity. The 54-page book is available free from the Downloads section of this site.

Activities Story

“My Name Is” in Uzbek

How to spell it:
Mening ismim _____.

How to Say It:
meh-NING ihs-MOOM (The “oo” is pronounced as the “oo” in “good.”)


Activities Story

Uzbekistan Upside Down Calculator

To find the missing words in the sentences about Uzbekistan below, type the number shown on a calculator. Turn the calculator upside down to read the answer.

For example, in the sentence “Factories in Uzbekistan make 53045,” type “53045” on the calculator. Turn the calculator upside down to reveal the word “shoes.”

  1. The government seizes 537818 written in the Uzbek language.
  2. Ask God to 55378 Christians in Uzbekistan.
  3. A 4614 number of adults in Uzbekistan can read and write.
  4. The Aral Sea in Uzbekistan 53707water.
  5. Families in Uzbekistan raise chickens for their 5663.

Calculator Answers

1. Bibles; 2. Bless; 3. High; 4. Loses; 5. Eggs


Activities Story

Uzbek Coloring Pages

Coloring Page Coloring Page
Click each image to open a picture file.

Click the pictures to open a page you can print and color.


Feature Story

Ten Bold Believers Stories from 2008

Ruth

1. Uzbekistan: Student Prays for Teacher Who Threatened Her
Ruth and her family have been through many years of struggle. People in their town make fun of them for their faith in Christ. “Please pray for me,” Ruth wrote in a 2008 e-mail to a VOM worker. “At school the teacher asked me to tell about the ancient Greek gods. I said, ‘There are no gods. There is only one God.’

“The teacher said to me, ‘Be quiet. And quit telling your fairy tales at school or I will take you to the principal and you will be expelled.’”

Ruth’s e-mail continued, “I feel sorry for the teacher. She is a good person, but she does not know that Jesus loves her. She has her own children. I wish I could tell them stories from the Bible. Please pray for my teacher.”

Read the rest of this entry »


Activities Story

Farsi

Farsi, also called “Persian,” is the official language of Iran. Farsi is written in the same script as Arabic, but it is not the same language as Arabic. This is similar to the way Spanish and English are written using the same letters, but they are different languages.

The government of Iran fears that Muslims who hear the gospel in their own language will become Christians. Christian ethnic groups that speak other languages are not as much of a problem to the government.

Officials make life difficult for pastors who deliver sermons in Farsi. “Pastors who preach in Farsi are ordered to give a weekly report to the government,” said an Iranian Christian. “Also, it is a well-known fact that the government sends spies into the Farsi-speaking churches to take pictures and evaluate the activities of the church. The churches cannot do anything to stop the spies from coming.”

Farsi is read from right to left instead of left to right like English. Look at the chart below to learn how to pronounce some Farsi words and phrases. (Pronunciations are approximate.)

English

How to say it in Farsi

Praise the Lord KHOH-dah-rah SHOH-kr
Jesus loves you EE-saw doos-taht DAH-reh
Mother Mah-DAR
Father Pay-DAR
Yes BAH-lay
No Nah
Please LOHT-fan
Thank you Mam-NOON-ahm
Good bye KHOH-dah hah-fehz