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Bold Believers in North Korea

Bold Believers in North Korea includes stories, history and culture facts, activities, and recipes that help children understand the daily lives of people in a country where citizens are forbidden to practice Christianity. The 54-page book is available free from the Downloads section of this site.

Activities Story

Ukrainian Children Encourage Prisoners

Christian children in Ukraine have been writing letters of encouragement to Christian prisoners and former prisoners. They are mailing the letters in the yellow mailbox to Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, and Kazakhstan. (See the photo.)

The Soviet Union (also called the U.S.S.R.) used to be the world’s most powerful Communist country. It split up into smaller countries in the early 1990’s. Ukraine, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, and Kazakhstan are four of the smaller countries. The Ukrainian children want to encourage Christians who have not been treated fairly by their governments.

You can also encourage Christians in prison for their faithful spreading of the gospel. To send greetings to a Christian prisoner in another country, visit prisoneralert.com. Click on the name of a prisoner, then on “Write a Letter.” Follow the instructions to complete the process.

Or, to send your own greeting, continue the process until you get to the step in which a prisoner’s address is shown. Then instead of finishing the process and printing the letter, use the address provided to mail a greeting. (Find more instructions here.) Go to a post office to ask how much postage you will need to mail the letter.


Spotlight Story

Tanzania: Kids of Courage Beaten

Four Christian teens in Tanzania recently decided to reject their traditional beliefs and to follow Christ. The boys — Murri, 16; Lilash, 19; Lekutina, 16; and Sairiamu, 17 — belong to the Maasai tribe.

According to Maasai customs, Maasai boys wear long hair at certain stages of their lives. As a symbol of their new Christian faith, the four boys cut their hair. Their behavior offended others in their community. Just days after the teens became Christians, about 20 Maasai warriors attacked them at a Sunday morning church service. The warriors beat the boys with clubs.

Pray for the teens’ strength, growth in Christ, and witness. Pray that the Maasai warriors will come to know Jesus.

(Photo of Maasai warrior credit: Operation Change)

 


Spotlight Story

Pray for Children of the Persecuted

The February 2019 issue of The Voice of the Martyrs newsletter features stories about children who faithfully followed in the footsteps of their persecuted Christian parents.

Christians are encouraged to pray that the sons and daughters of persecuted Christians will:

*Place their faith in Jesus Christ at a young age

*Be inspired by their parents’ courageous faith to share the gospel with friends and classmates

*Not be pulled away by enticements of the world or other religions

*Actively participate in the Great Commission as they mature into adults

(Source: The February 2019 issue of The Voice of the Martyrs newsletter)

To Talk About
*What is the Great Commission?
*What does “enticements” mean?
*Can you name five “enticements of the world” that might be tempting to children of persecuted Christians?


Activities Story

Inside a Vietnamese Prison

Prison cell in Asia

The previous post told about a pastor in Vietnam who spent time in prison because of his work for the Lord.

Read below about conditions in Vietnamese prisons and try the activity. You can find the activity and more about Christians in Vietnam in Bold Believers in Vietnam, available in the Downloads section.

Outside Work
Some Christian prisoners in Vietnam are forced to make bricks or to work in the fields outside the prison 12 to 16 hours a day, seven days a week. They get very little food, and guards may beat them if they don’t work fast enough. “But they’d rather go outside, because inside is even worse,” said one Christian.

Crowded Cells
The prison cells are dark, crowded, and noisy. Larger cells hold 100 or more people. In smaller cells, six to eight people may be kept in a space about 8 feet by 10 feet. The prisoners don’t have mattresses, blankets, or pillows. Sometimes they are not allowed to have Bibles.

Try This
Mark off an 8-foot by 10-foot empty space. Stay in the space with five other people for about 15 to 20 minutes. Talk about where you would sleep and how you would live if you had to stay in the space all the time. Pray for those in prison for Christ. Share any Scriptures you could recite if you didn’t have access to a Bible.

To Talk About
If you had to live in a Vietnamese prison, what would you say about life there? Read below what some Vietnamese prisoners said about their time in prison.

*“Being in prison gave me more time to have a deeper relationship with God.”

*“I learned more about the true values of life.”

*“It was an honor to serve the Lord in this way.”

*“Going to prison encouraged me to continue my Christian work when I got out. After being in prison, I was more willing to risk going back to prison again.”

*“In prison, I had the opportunity to lead my cellmates, and even guards, to Christ.”


Spotlight Story

Vietnam: A Good Example

Emmanuel spent much of his free time lifting weights. He traveled from province to province in Vietnam competing in bodybuilding contests. (A province is like a state.)

Emmanuel’s father was a pastor, and Emmanuel grew up resenting his father’s time away from his family ministering to others. When Emmanuel was 11, his father went to prison for three years because of his Christian activities. Then Emmanuel was even more angry.

“Sometimes I didn’t even want to visit my father in prison,” he said.

Several years later, after his father was released, Emmanuel served as his dad’s bodyguard at ministry events in dangerous parts of Vietnam. Emmanuel’s training as a bodybuilder had made him strong and confident. Emmanuel began to see not only his dad at work in ministry, but also God at work.

“I did not realize the importance of ministry,” Emmanuel said. “I intended to go with my father to protect him and just do ordinary work. But later God showed me what I had been through was the way He was training me for my future in ministry.”

Today Emmanuel admires his father’s faithfulness in leading people to trust in Christ. “He left us a good name,” Emmanuel said. “He has been a good example to follow.”

Now Emmanuel visits villages and shares the gospel with tribal people who worship false gods. He often is away from his wife and daughter as he travels. And, like his father, he has been persecuted by the police. “My ministry is the same as my father’s was,” said Emmanuel. “I live more for God now.”

(Source: The February 2019 issue of The Voice of the Martyrs newsletter. Photo: Emmanuel. His eyes are covered to protect his identity from those who might want to harm him.)

To Talk About
*Why was Emmanuel angry with his father?
*How do you think Emmanuel’s daughter feels about his being away from home so often? Will you pray for her?
*Who are the good examples in your life?