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Ada’s Mission

Ada's Mission
A Christian youth group in Nepal

In the snowy mountains of Tibet, “Ada” helped people called “nomads” grow food gardens. Nomads live in tents and move from place to place each season. They wear clothes made of sheep’s wool or yak hair from the animals they raise.

One day, police showed up at Ada’s house and took her to prison. They told her to write a paper that said she had broken the law. But Ada was doing God’s work. She had not done the bad things they wanted her to write. “What should I do?” Ada wondered. She prayed for God’s help, and Jesus told her to write only the truth.

Instead of saying that she did the bad things, Ada wrote about the good things Jesus has done for her. This made the police angry. They snatched up Ada’s paper and ripped it to pieces. Then they shoved another blank paper toward her and told her to write what they wanted. Ada only wrote about Jesus. The police became so mad they beat her.

Ada was afraid she would not be strong when she was in prison, but Jesus was with her, just like He promised. Jesus worked through her to tell her persecutors that He loved them and wanted to forgive them. Ada prayed for the men who hurt her and told them, “Jesus loves you.”

When the police realized Ada would not write what they wanted, they let her go. They said, “Leave our country and don’t come back.” They didn’t want her to tell anyone else about Jesus.

Not only did Jesus help Ada through her suffering, but He also helped her love those who hurt her. Ada loved the people of Tibet so much that she cried when she had to leave. She still wanted to share Jesus’s love with them.

But God had a plan for Ada. Tibetan nomads also live in a nearby country called Nepal. And that’s where God sent her next. Now Ada shows God’s love to the nomads in Nepal.

J.G. Spires, who wrote this story, was a college intern at The Voice of the Martyrs in the summer of 2016.


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