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Easter Cross

You can make a cross that helps you remember persecuted Christians (Hebrews 13:3) at Easter and throughout the year.

Needed
Cardstock or poster board
Yarn (or twine)
Glue
Printed (or written) names of countries where Christians are persecuted, or “Pray for the Persecuted,” or a Bible verse reference

Instructions
1. Draw a 7½-inch tall and 5½-wide cross on cardstock or poster board. Cut out the cross.
2. Cut two 4-inch pieces and one 8-inch piece of yarn.
3. Apply glue to cover the long piece of the cross. Stick the end of the 8-inch segment of yarn to the cross, starting at the top. Attach the yarn to the cross little by little, until the outer edge of the piece is outlined with the yarn. Continue wrapping the yarn around the cross, working from the outside to the inside until the piece is completely covered. Trim the end of the yarn if necessary.
4. Repeat the process with the shorter parts of the cross, one at a time.
5. Glue on printed (or written) names of countries where Christians are persecuted, or “Pray for the Persecuted,” or a Bible verse reference.
6. Hang up the cross as a reminder to think of Christians who are persecuted for their faith in the one whose resurrection we celebrate at Easter.


Easter Prayers for Muslims

Cross

The Quran is the Muslim holy book. Chapter 4, Verse 157 of the Quran says, “[They claimed]…’We killed Christ Jesus the son of Mary, the Apostle of God,’ but they killed him not, nor crucified him, but so it was made to appear to them…” (Sura 4:157, Yusuf Ali translation).

So Muslims do not believe that Jesus was crucified. During the Easter season, pray that Muslims will understand that Jesus died, rose again, and conquered death.

Pray especially for radical Muslims who persecute Christians. Pastor Richard Wurmbrand, the founder of The Voice of the Martyrs, said, “They will not succeed in making us hate them.” Their persecution of Christians will just make us want to do more to bring them the message of Christ. If they understand what Jesus taught, they will no longer wasn’t to persecute others.


Links in the Chain

In the following skit, a Christian prisoner recognizes that he is a link in the chain of faithful Christians from the past who have sacrificed for Christ.

Links in the Chain

Characters
Narrator
Prison Official
Prisoner
Several Links in the Chain

Read the rest of this entry »


Safely Home

An evangelist in India once told the following story.

One day a scientist found some bird eggs that had not hatched. He took the eggs to a country where the climate was cold.

The scientist hoped the baby birds that hatched from the eggs would think the new country was their home. He hoped they would be happy to stay in their new home.

The birds hatched, and they stayed in their new home during the summer. But when the summer was over, they flew back to the country where the scientist had found their eggs. They never came back.

Christians are like the birds, the Indian evangelist said. We were born in this world, but it is not our home. When the time comes for us to leave the earth, we will go to a true eternal home in heaven.

To Think About
Persecuted Christians understand that the Christians’ eternal home is in heaven. Hebrews 11:13-16 talks about heroes of our faith with such an “eternal perspective.” How can the knowledge that our true home is in heaven give us the courage to face the struggles we have on earth?

Hebrews 11:13–16: These all died in faith, not having received the promises, but having seen them afar off were assured of them, embraced them and confessed that they were strangers and pilgrims on the earth. For those who say such things declare plainly that they seek a homeland. And truly if they had called to mind that country from which they had come out, they would have had opportunity to return. But now they desire a better, that is, a heavenly country. Therefore God is not ashamed to be called their God, for He has prepared a city for them.


Saving a Generation

(Source: persecution.com/bibles)

When 9-year-old Jovia Mulungi opened her Bible for the first time, she knew it would change her life. Even at her age, she understood that God’s Word and the life lessons it contains would set her on the right path.

“I want to learn about making choices because it’s good,” she said. “I do not want to lie. I do not want to fight with my friends. I want to be obedient to my mother and father. Thank you for giving me this book to read about the choices people made. I want to become like Jesus. Pray for me.”

VOM distributes children’s Bibles in rural parts of Uganda, where Islam is spreading rapidly and Bibles are rare even among adults. Parents there are thrilled when their children receive their own Bibles.

“I have read this book as if reading a novel, cover to cover, to find out if there is any fault in it before I can allow my children to use it,” said Bridget Muwanga, the parent of another child who received a Bible. “I realized that I need it first before I can pass it on. It challenges me on the choices I have made. We are now going through it as a family, challenging one another. My husband just loves it.”

As the Bibles were distributed to a group of Christian children, some nearby Muslim children asked if they could have a copy, too. Members of the distribution team happily gave them each a copy of their own.

“We thank God for this ministry and pray that we can touch so many children and families with the love of God through this material,” a member of the distribution team said. “Making the right choices is always a challenge, but when we nurture children through this material we are surely saving a whole generation.”