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Who Was Corrie ten Boom?

Corrie ten Boom

Corrie ten Boom, who lived from 1892 to 1983, was the youngest daughter of Casper and Cor ten Boom of Holland. She had no interest in fancy clothes or worldly entertainment. She loved her family, and she learned from her father to love all people. In her free time, she held Christian classes for children with special needs.

Corrie was trained in watch repair and became the first licensed female watchmaker in Holland. She was imprisoned during World War II for protecting Jews from Nazi persecution by hiding them in a secret room in her house. After the war, she helped victims of the war to heal from their mental and physical wounds, and she learned to forgive her family’s persecutors.

Source: The Corrie ten Boom Story Leader’s Guide available in the Downloads section. The accompanying Student Guide includes activities, hidden pictures, a code, a puzzle, coloring pages, and a play.


Silence

Wurmbrand
Pastor Wurmbrand in prison

Pastor Richard Wurmbrand, who started The Voice of the Martyrs, was in prison in Romania for his Christian activities. He spent part of his time in prison in “solitary confinement,” meaning he was by himself in a silent cell.

After he left prison, Pastor Wurmbrand wrote the following.

“Two thousand years ago a Greek man name Phocion waited his turn to get his beard trimmed by a barber. The barber talked on and on about current events to the customer he was shaving. Phocion waited wearily while the barber talked.

“Finally the barber turned to Phocion and asked, ‘How would you like to have your beard trimmed?’

“Phocion replied, ‘In silence.’”

Pastor Wurmbrand continued, “We are victims of a plot against silence. Every day we hear the noise of cars, trains, planes, radios, TVs, vacuum cleaners, dishwashers, fans, chatter, clatter, and speech.

“I have known Christians who have spent years in solitary confinement in complete silence. When they once again heard humans speak, they wondered why so much of their speech was unimportant.

“If you wish to talk to God, create some silence around you. Turn off the noises that intrude on silence. You will learn more from God if you listen, as did Jesus when he spent whole nights in prayer on silent mountains.”

(Source: Reaching Toward the Heights by Richard Wurmbrand. Edited, paraphrased, and adapted.)

To Think About

  • Sit still and note all the noises you hear. Which noises would not have existed in Bible times?
  • Do you have a daily “quiet time” when you can read the Bible and pray without distractions?

A Brave Boy

VietnamTong comforts his mother

Tong is a 7-year-old boy from a Christian family in Vietnam, where Christians in some parts of the country are persecuted. In his village, Christians had a very hard life. So Tong, his parents, and other Christians left the village and fled to another part of the country.

The Christians started a church in their new village. The local police did not like having a church in their area.

One day, they arrested Tong’s mother while she was working on their farmland. They told her she would have to stay in jail until they found Tong’s father.

The police found and arrested Tong’s and released his mom. They treated Tong’s father very badly. Sadly, he died from the harsh conditions in the prison.

Tong’s mother is often sad since her husband’s death. Tong bravely tries to comfort her.

“[God] administers justice for the fatherless and the widow, and loves the stranger, giving him food and clothing” (Deuteronomy 10:18).

(Source of story: VOM’s sister mission in the Netherlands, SDOK)


Spreading the Word in Georgia

MaryamMaryam

You may know that Georgia is a state in the United States. But it is also a country north of Turkey.

Maryam, a 14-year-old girl in the country of Georgia, is a Christian. It’s not always popular in Georgia to talk about Jesus and the Bible in public.

But Maryam got permission from her school principal to pass out Christian books in the Georgian language to some of her classmates. Maryam also hands out the books, provided by The Voice of the Martyrs, on the street.

Praise God for Christian youth who share his love with others!


Say a Prayer, Write a Letter

ChinaLacheng Ren (left) and Wenxi Li (right) are imprisoned in China

Parents and Teachers: The December 2013 issue of The Voice of the Martyrs newsletter features ways The Voice of the Martyrs works around the world, and ways readers have participated in remembering and helping persecuted Christians. To subscribe to the free monthly newsletter, visit our subscription signup page.

As you read the newsletters, you may want to share stories from this site about the featured countries with your children. Then pray together for the people in the stories.

The following is an excerpt from the January 2014 The Voice of the Martyrs newsletter.

This month, we encourage you to write to two Chinese [Christians] who are in prison for attempting to provide Bibles to the growing Chinese church. Lacheng Ren and Wenxi Li were arrested for attempting to establish a bookstore in Taiyuan province.

Lacheng was sentenced to five years in prison and Wenxi was sentenced to two years for the “crime” of attempting to open the Enyu Bookstore. Even though they had a license for their business, police confiscated hundreds of books that Wenxi had brought from Beijing to sell at the store. When police raided the bookstore in May 2012, they shouted at the workers, “Don’t you dare bring Christian culture here! This is our turf!”

Among the “illegal” products that were confiscated were audio books of parts of the Bible, but the Chinese government continues to tell the world that Bibles are legal in China and that there is no persecution. Both men have appealed their prison sentences, but it is unclear when the Chinese courts will rule on the appeals. The men need our prayer and encouragement right now. Information on how to write to the men is available at www.prisoneralert.com.

We often pray that God will encourage Christians in prison. Writing letters is one way we can be a part of God’s answer to that prayer. Letters do make a difference.