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Kids of Courage: 2006 Top Ten Bold Believers Stories

Nigeria

Note: To protect their identities, the names of some of the people on this Web site and some identifying details have been changed. Some of the quotes are edited and paraphrased from the original sources for clarity.

The following stories are about kids and families who bravely continued to serve the Lord in the face of struggles or danger. As you read the stories, please pray for these Christians and also for thousands of others around the world who face similar struggles.

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Morocco: Happy Meal

Morocco

Note: To protect their identities, the names of some of the people on this Web site and some identifying details have been changed. Some of the quotes are edited and paraphrased from the original sources for clarity.

A Natural Thing to Do
David, age 7, and Lena, age 9, pray before their meal when they eat at restaurants. They also pray before they eat at home, before bedtime, and at family devotions. “It is the natural thing to do,” said their father Mark.

Mark grew up in a Muslim family in Morocco. After a friend invited him to Bible study classes, Mark gave his life to Jesus. He married a Christian girl, Sarah. When David and Lena were born, Mark and Sarah taught them to love Jesus, read the Bible, and pray.

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Morocco: A Bully Finds a Better Way

Morocco

Aaron was a Muslim teenager from a large family in Morocco. Sometimes he was a bully to his sisters and cousins. He called them names and started arguments with them for little or no reason.

Many young people from Morocco leave their country and get jobs in another country. Two of Aaron’s older cousins, Esther and John, did just that. In his new home, John met some Christians who shared with him the truth about Jesus.

When Aaron heard that John had become a Christian, he was upset. The Muslim holy book, the Koran, says that Muslims who convert to other religions are “losers” (Koran Sura 3:85). Then Aaron found out that Esther had also decided to give her life to Jesus.

Aaron began e-mailing John to ask him questions. “Why did you and Esther become Christians?” he asked. “Is it because you are around other Christians and you wanted to follow their customs? Is it just a new habit you started?”

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North Korea: In Trouble for Telling the Truth

North Korea

Note: To protect their identities, the names of some of the people on this Web site and some identifying details have been changed. Some of the quotes are edited and paraphrased from the original sources for clarity.

Cheerleaders in Jail
News reports in early 2006 told a strange story. The reports said that several cheerleaders were sent to prison in North Korea. Some people say the cheerleaders were arrested for talking about things they saw on a trip to South Korea.

The North Korean government sent cheerleaders to athletic games in South Korea three times in recent years. The cheerleaders surprised and impressed everyone with their perfect-looking performances. But later, a prison inmate who escaped from North Korea said he had seen some of the cheerleaders in prison.

Reporters are not sure if the cheerleaders are really in prison for “talking too much.” But it would not be unusual for North Korea to punish people for speaking the truth.

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A Pencil Gets Courage

North Korea

Pencil was scared. His three friends, Eraser, Paper Clip, and Pen, had just been arrested. Pencil and his friends were Christians in North Korea. The North Korean government has harsh rules to control the activities of believers. The three Christians were arrested for sharing the gospel.

Pencil was a Christian too, but he was too shy and scared to share his faith. When he tried, his mouth became dry, his hands shook, and he couldn’t make the words come out of his mouth. He was even more fearful after his friends were arrested.

Pencil and his friends had learned about Jesus from a Chinese Christian worker. The Christian encouraged them to use nicknames to make it harder for the police to know who they really were. So the friends had chosen the names of school supplies for their nicknames.

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