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Big Faith and a Brave Heart

Vietnam

(The following true testimony tells the story of Trinh, a young Vietnamese woman now living in the U.S. Trinh tells what her life was like as a young Christian in Vietnam when she was about the age of the Vietnamese girl in the photo. The testimony is adapted and paraphrased from interviews with Trinh and her mother. Her name and some identifying details have been changed to protect her identity.)

Growing Up In Vietnam
At school in Vietnam, kids questioned me about my faith. There were Buddhists, Hindus, and others. They would say, “There is no difference between Buddhism and Christianity.” I would say, “Yes, there is a difference.” I am still praying for them and believe one day they will be Christians.

I began driving a motorbike at age 13, without a license. It’s not necessary to have a license in Vietnam. It’s different in America. People drive cars and there are rules and regulations. There are no rules in Vietnam. On the motorbike, I helped my pastor and his wife in their ministry.

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Cuba: Nothing Stops Pedro

Cuba

Free From Sin
Pedro, who lives in Cuba, was a delinquent. (His picture is shown to the left. His face is covered to protect his identity.) A delinquent is someone who does not obey the law. Pedro spent a lot of time in jail because of all the crimes he committed.

Then Pedro learned that Christ can save people from a sinful life, and he gave his life to Jesus! He was free from being a slave to sin! Do you think Pedro quit going to jail? Well, no, he did not.

Pedro was so excited about his new freedom in Christ that he wanted to tell EVERYONE about it. He even began witnessing in parks and preaching on the streets.

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Indonesia: “I Will Keep Loving Jesus Forever”

Indonesia

Merpati is a high school student in the Muslim country of Indonesia. Muslims worship Allah, who they believe is the creator of the world. They do not believe salvation from sin is by the grace of God through faith in Jesus Christ. It is against the Indonesian government’s rules to lead a non-Christian to Christ.

One thousand students go to Merpati’s school, but only three of them are Christians. Merpati is one of the three. Her family is Muslim. Here is her story. (The story below is translated, paraphrased, and edited from original testimonies. Merpati’s name has been changed to protect her identity.)

“After I became a Christian, I dared to bring my Bible to school. All my friends, my Muslim friends, are curious about the Book. They also want to read the Bible, so I let them.

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Ani: “We Are Not Shocked by Suffering”

Indonesia

Workers from The Voice of the Martyrs talked with a Christian girl named Ani in Indonesia. Two years before the interview, Ani’s village was attacked by radical “Laskar Jihad” Muslims. The attackers burned Ani’s home and church. Sadly, Ani’s grandfather died in the attack. Ani and her grandmother escaped into the forest. Here is what Ani told the VOM workers.

VOM: How old are you?
Ani: I am 16.

VOM: Tell me about going to school.
Ani: I am in the first grade of senior high school. I study at school from 7:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. I like all subjects, but I especially hope I can have success in English.

VOM: Where do you and your family live?
Ani: All of my family, including my grandmother, live in a refugee camp. I am not living with them. I’m living with a family in another district, because I have to go to school in this area.

VOM: What does your house look like?
Ani: The walls are made of bamboo, the roof of leaves, and the floor is soil.

VOM: Do you get enough food?
Ani: I get enough food with rice and vegetables, but I never get a balanced diet.

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North Korea: Nothing Can Separate Us

North Korea

North Korea’s Reality TV
Television cameramen in North Korea recently took their cameras out into the streets and began filming people. They went to a store, a bus stop, a restaurant, and a sports stadium.

What were they looking for?
They were taking pictures of men with hair more than five centimeters (about two inches) long. Those with longer hair were shown on television as bad examples.

The government of North Korea controls the everyday life of its people. The government’s television series, called “Let Us Trim Our Hair in Accordance with Socialist Lifestyle,” was an effort to control men’s hair. (“Socialist” refers to the type of government that controls North Korea.) North Korean government officials said long hair takes energy away from the brain. However, women are allowed to have long hair. (Sources include: BBC News)

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