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Make a Coptic Cross

Needed: Paper, old CDs or DVDs, scissors, pencils, colored paper or poster board

Note: Some Coptic Christians in Egypt tattoo a cross on the inside of their wrist as a reminder of their Christian faith. Gangs that kidnap Christians remove the cross tattoos of their victims. But they can’t remove Jesus from the Christians’ hearts.

Read more about Coptic Christians in the Egypt Lesson Plan here.


Snack from Ethiopia

 

Read  about courageous Christians in Ethiopia in Bold Believers in Ethiopia, available in the free Downloads section.


Make a Brick

Many Christians in Pakistan have to work at brick kilns because better jobs often go to Muslim workers. A Christian woman who worked in a brick kiln explained more about what life is like for brick kiln workers.

“My family is uneducated and poor. I never went to school. I have been working at the brick kiln my whole life. I never played with toys because I was busy making bricks the whole day. In my free time, I took care of my younger brothers and sisters. I made the first brick that I made by myself when I was 10. I was very happy that I learned the art of making bricks to earn some money. I knew that my little income could not feed my family. But I could support them a little bit with what I made. At that time a brick kiln worker earned 40 cents for making 1,000 bricks. Today they earn $5 for 1,000 bricks.”

You can make a brick by mixing 2 cups of straw (or dried grass), 4 quarts of dirt, and 6 cups of water. Line a shoebox with plastic, such as a trash bag. Tape the plastic to the outside of the box to secure it. Pour some of the dirt mixture into the box. Let it dry in the sun for about two days. Take it out of the box and turn it over so the bottom can dry.


Tibetan Wooden Tablet Painting

Traditional Tibetan artists sometimes painted pictures on small wooden tablets of various shapes. Some of the tablets had handles so viewers could hold the paintings without damaging them.

To make a tablet painting, draw a geometric shape (like a trapezoid or hexagon) on a piece of white cardboard or poster board 8½ by 11-inches or smaller. Cut out the shape and draw a colorful picture on it. Can you color a picture on your tablet that illustrates one of God’s promises? Glue a craft stick to the back of your painting so that it extends about 3 inches below the bottom of the tablet.

Watch a video clip about Christians in Tibet here.


Barazek: Syrian Cookies

Ingredients
2 1/2 cups of flour
3/4 cup of sugar
1/2 cup of butter or margarine
1/3 cup of sesame seeds
1/3 cup of water
2 teaspoons of honey
1/2 teaspoon of baking powder

Instructions
1.    Toast 1/3 cup of sesame seeds in a dry frying pan over medium heat, stirring until the seeds are light brown.
2.    Pour the seeds in a bowl, and stir in 2 teaspoons of honey. Set aside.
3.    Mix 2 1/2 cups of flour, 3/4 cups of sugar, and 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder.
4.    Add 1/2 cup of butter or margarine. Stir it into the mixture as you would if making pie crust. Add 1/3 cup of water, and stir just until dough forms. Add a little flour if it is too sticky to handle easily. (For even easier handling, chill for several hours.)
5.    Use your hands to make dough balls that are larger than a marble and smaller than a ping-pong ball. Flatten the balls somewhat, and put them on a lightly greased cookie sheet, leaving some space between them. Spoon a little of the sesame seed and honey mixture onto the top of each cookie, and slightly press it into the top of the cookie.
6.   Bake for 15 to 18 minutes at 350˚degrees until lightly browned.

Learn about courageous Syrian Christians in Bold Believers in Syria, free in Downloads section.