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Kids of Courage VBS Skit

The complete Kids of Courage VBS curriculum includes a director’s guide, crafts, activities, five teachers’ guides, skits, plays, photo and music CDs, games, snacks, The Voice of the Martyrs prayer map, and more. Learn more here.

In the following skit from the VBS curriculum, a Christian prisoner recognizes that he is a link in the chain of faithful Christians from the past who have sacrificed for Christ.

Links in the Chain
Characters
Narrator
Prison Official
Prisoner
Several Links in the Chain

Props
Small table and chair
Paper and pen
Several signs with the name of a Christian martyr on one side and the student’s name on the other (see below)
Optional: strips of construction paper, partially completed paper chain, tape

Suggested Costumes
Old torn clothes for Prisoner
Uniform for Prison Official

(The Prison Official is seated at a table. A pen and paper are on the table. The Prisoner is standing by the table.)

Narrator: Several years ago, police locked a Christian in prison in a country where Christians were persecuted. The prison officials asked the prisoner to sign a statement. The statement accused other Christians of breaking the law. If the prisoner signed the statement, the other Christians would be arrested.

Prison Official: Sign this statement! Things will go easier for you if you just do what I say.

Prisoner: The chain keeps me from signing this.

Prison Official: But you are not in chains!

Prisoner: I am. I am bound by the chain of witnesses who gave their lives for Jesus throughout the centuries. I am a link in this chain. I will not break it.

(Prisoner and Prison Official exit.)
(Optional: Provide background music that includes a song about faithfulness to God.)

(Students, Links in the Chain, enter single file and stand in a line across the stage. As students take their places one by one, they recite the name of someone who sacrificed for Christ, and if desired, a phrase about that person’s sacrifice. Each student may hold up a sign with the name of a Christian on it. Examples include: “Stephen, the first martyr for Christ” and “Paul, who said ‘the word of God is not chained.’” Others can include heroes from Christian history and modern persecuted Christians.)

Narrator: The apostle Paul asked his friends to “remember his chains.” We may not be called to die for our faith. But we can be links in the chain by remembering those who are persecuted and by praying for them. We, too, are bound by the chain of witnesses who gave their lives for Jesus throughout the centuries.

Links in the Chain: (speaking one by one) I am a link in the chain. (As they speak, they may turn their signs over, revealing their own names on the back.)

(Optional: The audience can be allowed to respond by coming forward at the end of the skit, lining up, and saying one at a time when recognized, “I am a link in the chain.” If desired, have available a short paper chain made of construction paper and give students strips of paper for each to add to the chain as they say it. A teacher may help by taping the links as they are added.)


Recipes from Vietnam

Rice and banana pudding

Eggs and Onions
Fry one chopped onion in 1 tbsp. oil. Separately, mix 3 eggs, 1 chopped green onion, and 2 tsp. fish sauce. Add the mixture to the pan with the fried onion and scramble. Serve hot with rice.

Rice and Banana Pudding
Combine and bring to a boil 2 sliced bananas, ½ cup water, 3 tbsp. honey, 1 tsp. vanilla, and ½ tsp. cinnamon. Simmer 3 to 5 minutes. Stir in 1½ cups of cooked brown rice, 1 15-to 20-ounce can of pineapple tidbits (drained), and 1 cup of coconut milk (or plain milk). Return to a boil, then simmer 5 minutes. Let stand 15 minutes before serving.

Learn more about life in Vietnam and bold Vietnamese believers from these resources:
Bold Believers in Vietnam, available in the free Downloads section.


No Complaints

Leanna Cinquanta, a missionary to India, recently visited The Voice of the Martyrs and shared stories of Indian Christians with VOM workers.

“Every 40 hours, another Christian [in India] is attacked,” Leanna told the workers. “Persecution in India has now become a lifestyle; it’s not an incident….It’s not an event; it’s in the atmosphere.”

But Indian Christian pastors are persevering. They understand that persecution is part of being a Christian. (See 2 Timothy 3:12.) The pastors are persevering under persecution, not complaining.

Activity
Needed: Duct tape, scissors, writing instruments (optional)
Cut a piece of duct tape 1 inch longer than necessary to fit around your wrist. Cut off the top half of the strip 1 inch from the right end and the bottom half of the strip 1 inch from the left end. Fold the tape in half lengthwise, sticky sides together. Wrap the tape around your wrist, fastening it by pressing the exposed sticky parts together. (You may want to write a Bible verse on your band.)

Read aloud Philippians 2:14 and 4:4, and James 1:2. Many persecuted Christians talk about how they experienced God’s comfort during their struggles. God’s presence helps them to not complain.

Try praising God instead of complaining when things do not go your way. Keep your wristband on as long as you can. When you complain about something, remove it. You may want to ask family members or classmates to join you in the project and see who can keep their band on the longest, while remembering Christians who rejoice in spite of their trials.


Langdi, A Game of India

Children playing langdi

Divide students into two teams with an equal number of players. Set off a small area as a playing field. To begin, one team is on the field, and a “raider” team is off the field. The raider team sends one raider (player) into the territory of the team on the field. The raider must hop on one foot while tagging as many players as possible.

The other team’s players try to run away from the raider to avoid being tagged, but they must stay within the boundaries of the field. If the raider’s other foot touches the ground, he or she is out of the game. If he or she is able to hop off the court on one foot successfully, anyone he or she tagged is out.

After the raiders’ turn, the teams switch positions. Those who were tagged out during the first raiders’ turn stay out of the game. The game is over when all the players on one team are out. The other team wins. If raiders are having difficulty tagging members of the other team, reduce the size of the playing field.

(Source: Bold Believers in India, available in the free Downloads section)


10 Ways to Help Persecuted Christians in Less than 10 Minutes

1. Find out about Action Packs here . Tell your friends about the project, and make a plan to help them order and pack Action Packs to send to a country where Christians are persecuted.

2. Pray for persecuted Christians while waiting in line or riding to school or church.

3. Take The Voice of the Martyrs magazines to your next doctor or dentist visit. Ask if you can leave them in the waiting room.

4. Let a children’s pastor know about the Kids of Courage VBS curriculum. Visit here to get facts to share with them.

5. Visit VOM’s icommittopray.com site and make a list of three people you can pray for this week during mealtime prayers.

6. Read about Family Med Packs here. Ask your parents or teacher if you can participate in providing a Med Pack for victims of attacks by radical Muslims.

7. Visit prisoneralert.com and learn about writing letters to persecuted Christian prisoners.

8. A family in Utah put spare coins in a jar for a year, then sent the money to VOM to help persecuted Christians. They called the jar “the jar for the unknown soldier” in honor of Christians around the world who need encouragement. Decorate a jar to set in your house or classroom. Invite your family or classmates to help you collect spare change for a project to help struggling Christians.

9. Tell three friends about a story you read on this website and encourage them to visit the site to learn more about persecuted Christians.

10. Download the “One Hundred Ways Poster” from the Downloads section of this site to share with other Christians.