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Imprisoned for Christ Virtual Event

Parents and Teachers
The Voice of the Martyrs, with help from LifeWay, is hosting a FREE virtual event on Friday, March 5 that will feature three inspiring speakers: Petr Jasek, Andrew Brunson and Dan Baumann. In addition to individual testimonies from the former prisoners for Christ, the event will include a panel discussion and worship music from Dove Award-winning artist Natalie Grant.

If your kids are youth or especially mature older children, you may want to consider watching the event with them. To register or for more information, visit persecution.com/event.


Imprisoned for Christ Virtual Event

Parents and Teachers
The Voice of the Martyrs, with help from LifeWay, is hosting a FREE virtual event on Friday, March 5, 2021, that will feature three inspiring speakers: Petr Jasek, Andrew Brunson and Dan Baumann. In addition to individual testimonies from the former prisoners for Christ, the event will include a panel discussion and worship music from Dove Award-winning artist Natalie Grant.

If your kids are youth or especially mature older children, you may want to consider watching the event with them. To register or for more information, visit persecution.com/event.

Note: If you want to receive a free Church Host Kit to help host the event at your church, please register by Friday, February 12.


Escaping North Korea

The previous post told about a North Korean man who escaped his country and now lives in South Korea. But traveling from North Korea to South Korea is risky, with many obstacles along the way.

The border between North Korea and South Korea is heavily guarded, so most people who escape take other routes.

(Photo: North Korean border guard) Two of the most common routes are shown on the map above.

Using the map as a guide, answer the questions below.

*What country do the escapees cross to reach Mongolia?
*Beijing is the capital of what country?
*What country is south of Laos and Thailand?
*What country do they cross to get from Mongolia to South Korea?
*To what country do they go after they reach Laos?

Pray that all North Koreans, both in and out of their country, will come to know Jesus.


Life Outside of Prison

(Source: VOM Radio. Edited for length and clarity. Photo: Christians in Iran praying.)

Robert Aserian was a pastor in Iran, where most people are Muslims. The government in Iran does not want anyone to teach Muslims about Jesus. But Pastor Aserian wanted to tell everyone about his Savior — including Muslims. That’s how he ended up in prison.

A previous post told about the difficult conditions Pastor Aserian endured in prison. Then he understood that God was with him, and he was in God’s plan. And he had peace. “OK, Lord,” he prayed. “If You are here, I can be in prison for years.”

He didn’t have to stay in prison for years. But life wasn’t easy outside of prison either. The pastor told Todd Nettleton of VOM Radio what life is like for released Christians in Iran. Read part of their conversation below.

Pastor Aserian: We were always under observation and control. We couldn’t contact any Christians, because that person would get in trouble [for talking to us].

Todd: It’s very difficult to be a pastor when you’re not allowed to talk to any of your congregation.

Pastor Aserian: Yes. One difficult experience church leaders have is when they are set free, other believers are afraid to contact them. They become so alone. I even heard some of them say, “When we were in prison, it wasn’t so bad. Now our situation is much worse.”

Todd: We think of people who are in prison, and we pray for them, “Lord, sustain them while they are in prison.” Then they get released and we say, ‘Wow, praise the Lord. He has answered their prayer; they are out of prison.” But that may be the time they need prayer even more.

Pastor Aserian: Exactly.

Todd: So I would encourage our [VOM Radio] listeners who are praying for a Christian in prison. We want you to do that. Prisoneralert.com is a website of Christians in prison. But don’t just pray while they are in prison. They might actually need your prayers even more after they are released than they do while they are in prison.

To Do and Talk About
*Why might a released prisoner need prayer?
*Visit prisoneralert.com and choose a prisoner to pray for today.
*Find the list of released prisoners on prisoneralert.com, and choose one to pray for.

 


Eric Liddell

Eric Liddell was born on January 16th, 1902. Learn more about Eric and 15 other Christian heroes in The Torchlighters Ultimate Activity Book and DVD set, available at VOMBooks.com. The book includes 144 pages of stories, devotionals, coloring pages (see the image to the right), extreme dot-to-dots, crafts, and activities related to the 16 heroes on the accompanying Torchlighters DVDs.

Eric’s Story
Eric Liddell didn’t look like a champion when he ran, and people mocked his strange running style. But Eric was super fast. In fact, he was the fastest runner in all of Scotland. He had become a national hero, and his country was proud of him. They waited eagerly to see him compete against the world’s greatest athletes at the 1924 Olympics in Paris, where Eric was expected to win the gold medal for Great Britain in his event. Then the whole world would know that Scotland had the best 100-meter sprinter anywhere.

Eric did his best to win races, but he had a bigger goal for his life. Following his parents’ example and God’s call, he planned to be a missionary in China. Eric’s faith was even more important to him than the Olympics.

Then as the time for the Olympics approached, Eric decided not to run the 100-meter sprint — his best event! He had learned that the trials for the race were scheduled for a Sunday. Eric had always set aside the Lord’s Day for rest and worship, as the Bible teaches (Exodus 20:8-11). He refused to change his habits for the Olympics.

The people of Scotland were furious! Eric had crushed their hopes for a win for their country. It’s hard to imagine today how much importance they placed on Eric’s winning a gold medal. It seemed to Scotland that Eric was sacrificing loyalty to his country, fame, victory, and glory for a reason they didn’t understand. He was called a disgrace, a traitor, and a “letdown to his own people.”

Eric ran in the 200-meter and 400-meter races in the Olympics instead of his usual race. They had never been his best events. But he surprised the world with a gold medal and a new world record in the 400-meter event, and a bronze medal in the 200. Again he was a national hero.

Because of his fame, people listened to Eric. He used speaking opportunities to witness about his faith, and his fame continued to spread. He sacrificed his comfortable life in Scotland to serve with his wife as a missionary in China for 20 years. Then, as World War II reached them, Eric sacrificed the opportunity to leave China, staying instead to help the wounded and to share his faith. He died in China in 1945.